Clinton leads big in Ky., Obama modestly in Ore.i.l.cnn.net
Made popular 2325 days ago in Politics
cnn.com — New polls show Sen. Hillary Clinton with a commanding lead going into the Kentucky primary, while Sen. Barack Obama holds a comfortable one in Oregon.

Those two states, which hold contests Tuesday, are expected to do little more than illustrate the divide between Democratic voters in selecting a presidential candidate.

Clinton leads the latest CNN "poll of polls" - an average of multiple polls - in Kentucky, 58 percent to 28 percent. Kentucky is dominated by working-class voters, which has been a source of support for Clinton throughout the prolonged primary season.

Obama's base of support - young and higher-educated voters - are better represented in Oregon, and a poll of polls there reflects that demographic: The senator from Illinois holds a 50 percent to 40 percent advantage over Clinton.

The former first lady is campaigning Monday in Kentucky, while former President Clinton and daughter Chelsea are on the trail in Oregon.

Obama spoke Sunday in front of what his campaign called his biggest audience to date - 75,000 people on the banks of the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon.

Obama will campaign Monday in Montana, which, along with South Dakota, will hold the last contests of the primary season on June 3. Democratic voters in Puerto Rico will cast their ballots June 1.

Posted by HStern
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Who do you predict will win the Kentucky & Oregon Democratic Presidential Primaries?
Clinton Kentucky & Oregon
50%
Clinton Kentucky - Obama Oregon
37%
Obama Kentucky & Oregon
12%
Obama Kentucky - Clinton Oregon
0.7%
This is not a scientific survey, click here to learn more. Results may not total 100% due to rounding and voting descrepencies.
User Comments
Posted 2326 days ago
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Obama has moved on after declaring himself the winner of the primaries and supported by the media and the DNC. He does not think the remaining state votes are important. He has only been to Kentucky twice and thinks it is next to Arkansas so believes Clinton has the advantage. He has been to Oregon several times, but will wnt to see the Great Lakes, so did not find it necessary to have any devbates regarding the issues specific to Oregon. He voted against Oregon's energy bill. The voters are now looking at issues, performance and statements outside of speech making and they are finding out that Obama is not qualified to pass a 5th grade geography class, let alone run the Country. His argument with McCain is a distraction away from Clinton, but it is near-sighted and lacks substance. He has a great following with the younger group, but I have been talking with them and they are now saying they are not hearing answers or the how to make the hope come alive and the how to implement changes . He lacks experience, lacks on-going concern for the voters and can not discuss issues without a script in front of him. We are in serious toruble if he does become the nominee.
Posted 2326 days ago
0 up votes, 0 down votes
The polls reported by Fox new say Hillary is within 4 points of Obama in Oregon. She may pull this out !! Go Hillary.
Posted 2326 days ago
0 up votes, 0 down votes
Loing at the various selections, it appears that most of the responses were Senator Clinton supporters. Hey - Clinton wins KY (68%-32%) - Obama wins OR (59%-41%) and therefore, Senator Obama will HAVE PULLED more delegates the Clinton or the so-called benchmark/milestone of all the pledge delegates.
Posted 2325 days ago
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Since Sen. Clinton currently leads in the popular vote in the primary, it is not logical to 'count her out' as some have suggested:

* CLINTON - 16,691,639
* OBAMA - 16,648,060

Source: http://abcnews.go.com/politics

Also, since she appears to have a better chance against McCain according to most polls...

http://www.gordonwaynewatts.com/HowHillaryMightWin.html

http://www.gordonwatts.com/HowHillaryMightWin.html

...therefore, it is not logical to assume the superdelegates will vote for Obama.

In case people forget, let me remind you of the reason the 'Superdelegates' were created in the 1st place:

When it was discovered that the candidate with the most "pledged" delegates sometimes is not the strongest candidate for November (example: Jimmy Carter), it was decided that "superdelegates" would be created as a "correction factor":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superdelegate

http://superdelegates.org/Main_Page#The_Democratic_Delegate_Process

http://writ.news.findlaw.com/lazarus/20080214.html

All three links look very good. Therefore, it is only logical to conclude that whomever has the best chance against McCain will be chosen by the remaining undecided Superdelegates -which is not necessarily the same candidate who has the most "pledged" delegates.

If the Superdelegate merely picked the person which their home district picked, then why even give them the right to vote? So, since they do have a choice, they should be expected to pick the candidate with the best chance of winning in November. For the Democrats, that would currently be Sen. Clinton. Observe:

1. She is ahead in popular vote
2. Polls suggest she has the better chance against McCain
3. She has more experience

That all coud change -it is a close primary.
Posted 2325 days ago
0 up votes, 0 down votes
Ooops! ~~~ The last post's links weren't "clickable" -- let me try again, lol...

Since Sen. Clinton currently leads in the popular vote in the primary, it is not logical to 'count her out' as some have suggested:

* CLINTON - 16,691,639
* OBAMA - 16,648,060

Source: http://abcnews.go.com/politics



Also, since she appears to have a better chance against McCain according to most polls...

http://www.GordonWayneWatts.com/HowHillaryMightWin.html



http://www.GordonWatts.com/HowHillaryMightWin.html



...therefore, it is not logical to assume the superdelegates will vote for Obama.

In case people forget, let me remind you of the reason the 'Superdelegates' were created in the 1st place:

When it was discovered that the candidate with the most "pledged" delegates sometimes is not the strongest candidate for November (example: Jimmy Carter), it was decided that "superdelegates" would be created as a "correction factor":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superdelegate



http://superdelegates.org/Main_Page#The_Democratic_Delegate_Process



http://writ.news.findlaw.com/lazarus/20080214.html



All three links look very good. Therefore, it is only logical to conclude that whomever has the best chance against McCain will be chosen by the remaining undecided Superdelegates -which is not necessarily the same candidate who has the most "pledged" delegates.

If the Superdelegate merely picked the person which their home district picked, then why even give them the right to vote? So, since they do have a choice, they should be expected to pick the candidate with the best chance of winning in November. For the Democrats, that would currently be Sen. Clinton. Observe:

1. She is ahead in popular vote
2. Polls suggest she has the better chance against McCain
3. She has more experience

That all could change -it is a close primary, bur presently, the only thing Obama leads in is delegate count.

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